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030940904
HOUSE BILL NO. 2426
AMENDMENT IN THE NATURE OF A SUBSTITUTE
(Proposed by the House Committee on General Laws
on January 28, 2003)
(Patron Prior to Substitute--Delegate Nixon)
A BILL to amend the Code of Virginia by adding a section numbered 2.2-3808.2, relating to posting certain information on the Internet; prohibitions.

Be it enacted by the General Assembly of Virginia:

1. That the Code of Virginia is amended by adding a section numbered 2.2-3808.2 as follows:

2.2-3808.2. Posting certain information on the Internet; prohibitions.

A. Beginning July 1, 2003, no state agency or court clerk shall post on a state agency or court-controlled website any document that contains the following information: (i) an actual signature; (ii) a social security number; (iii) a date of birth identified with a particular person; (iv) the maiden name of a person's parent so as to be identified with a particular person; (v) any financial account number or numbers; or (vi) the name and age of any minor child.

B. Every agency and every court clerk that posts any document on a state agency or court-controlled website may require that any party who files documents in any form with such agency or clerk provide, in addition to the original document, a redacted copy of such documents that excises the information prohibited by subsection A. Failure to provide such redacted copy shall relieve the agency or court clerk of any liability or responsibility in the event that such information is posted on a state agency or court-controlled website.

Each such agency and clerk shall post notice that (i) includes a list of the documents routinely posted on its website, (ii) the information listed in subsection A shall be redacted from such documents, and (iii) such documents are for informational purposes only. Such notice shall indicate the location of the original document.

C. Nothing in this section shall be construed to prohibit access to any original document as provided by law.


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